A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians
Art,  Events,  May 8, 1945

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians Affected in Newfoundland

Painting by Paul Goranson, 1942 (reproduction)

You could meet military personnel everywhere on the home front. Goranson shows civilians mingling with the military on a train in Newfoundland.

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians

Painting by Alex Colville, 1946

The painting depicts soldiers moving painfully on a muddy path in the Netherlands, in December 1944. It looks as if they will get out of the picture. Colville said that his canvas “expressed the terrible life he had to lead: lack of sleep, food, constantly exposed to danger”. He added, “It’s amazing what these people were going through. They suffered it, these young people quite ordinary. ”

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians

Orville Fisher painting, 1945

Fisher, a war artist, landed on Juno Beach with 3rd Canadian Division. The Germans had covered with explosives the end of the obstacles erected on the beach, behind which the Canadians took shelter, to destroy the landing craft and to stop the tanks.

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians

Drawing by Alfred Hierl, 1945

In a controversial attempt to test the strength of German defense installations on the Atlantic coast, 4,963 soldiers from the 2nd Canadian Division participated in an assault on Dieppe, France, on August 19, 1942. The raid proved a disaster: 70 percent of them were killed, wounded or taken prisoner. Hierl was one of the German war artists who witnessed the carnage and who were the illustrators.

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians

Painting by Caven Atkins, 1942

In this scene from a shipyard in Toronto, the “V” Victory Banner recalls the purpose of the illustrated activity. Atkins believed that the painting of subjects related to the war industry was important because, according to him, “no war could be won or even won” without it.

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians

Painting by Miller Brittain, 1946

Brittain, who was a bomb thrower, wrote to his parents in 1944: “Despite their deadly effects, the night attacks are very pretty, seen from above. The target appears like a huge Christmas tree visible from a distance of about thirty kilometers, but behind, it looks more like images that I could see the entrance to hell. Later, he told them that at the same time that his painting was a faithful description of these attacks he did not like his painting so much: “In fact,” he confessed, “at this moment, I would rather want to to trample on it. ”

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians

Painting by Paraskeva Clark, 1947

In 1944, the National Gallery of Canada commissioned Clark to paint women in the armed forces. After some time with “Wrens” (members of the Women’s Royal Canadian Naval Service), she wrote that she “had lost all hope of finding any dramatic subject”. She added, “But I found it quite exciting that in some areas women were doing things that were once done to men, and as a result, they were releasing (perhaps) some men to fight or to work. in war industries. In another letter she claimed that this work presented a great challenge, but that the real story of women in wartime was more about their homes.

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians

Painting by Pegi MacLeod, 1944

The National Gallery of Canada commissioned MacLeod to paint the activities of female military personnel stationed there in 1944 and 1945. In this painting, members of the Canadian Women’s Army Service of Ottawa parade through morning inspection.

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians

Painting by Thomas Beament, 1943

These 11 exhausted sailors, seated in a shaken raft in all directions, were the crew of a merchant ship just torpedoed. Through the fog, they try to attract the attention of a ship that seems to pass quickly near them. There is reason to doubt that the destroyer can see them because it is difficult to spot their boat among the waves.

) (Source: http://www.warmuseum.ca )

A little art for May 8, 1945: The second world war seen by Canadians


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